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Jeffrey Smith On Why GMOs Were Created (Monsanto Patent)


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Time: 2:06 Added: 5/6/2013
Views: 43062

Jeffrey Smith is an expert in genetically modified foods. In this video he explains how an expiring Monsanto Patent was the cause for the practice starting and what some of the potential dangers are of GMOs.

Contributor(s): Smith, Jeffrey
Tags: toxins, genes, allergies, gmo, genetically modified food
Transcript:

Jeffrey let's start talking about GMOs and how and why did the thought of
genetically altering our food even start in the first place?

One of the main reasons that genetic engineering has come about is that
Monsanto had their roundup patent running out in the year 2000.  And so
they created Roundup ready crops for farmers so when they buy the seeds,
they sign a contract that they'll buy Monsanto's version of Roundup and
that extended in a kind of way, their patent on their most popular
herbicide in the world.   Their PR theory is that it's a more precise
method of what we're doing every day when we cross species, genes from the
mother and the father cross into the offspring and mix and match and create
new combinations.  Here you take a gene from one species and force it into
the DNA of another species so they call that more precise.  What's actually
happening is they're taking genes from species from kingdoms that have
never existed in the other kingdom.  The process of insertion plus cloning,
which is how they create the plant, causes massive collateral damage in the
DNA so there could be 100's or 1000's of mutations in the DNA as a result
of the process of genetic engineering and most of the problems associated
with that are dismissed.   They're not even evaluated so there's new
allergens, possibly new toxins and anti-nutrients, in the GM crops that we
don't even know about until perhaps some independent scientist does
research afterwards and discovers Monsanto's corn has a new allergen,
Monsanto's soy when cooked has up to 7 times the amount of an existing
allergen.  These are disregarded.
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