Finally Find Out if You're Sensitive to Gluten!

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12/12/2015
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Interviewer: You mentioned testing. What can people do to find out if they have a gluten sensitivity or, in fact, celiac disease?

Dr. Tom O'Bryan: That's a really good question. And until just a couple of years ago, the tests that were available were transglutaminase antibodies to transglutaminase or endomysium. Endomysium is the Saran Wrap that coats the shags.

Interviewer: Okay.

Dr. Tom O'Bryan: And transglutaminase is an enzyme inside the Saran Wrap. Now that Saran Wrap not only coats the shags, but it coats all of our organs; the liver, the kidneys, all of the organs. So if you have antibodies to transglutaminase, you're attacking the Saran Wrap, and that is the trigger that causes the shags to wear down. Those antibodies won't just attack the Saran Wrap of the microvilli, it will attack the Saran Wrap of your liver. That's why 48% of adults diagnosed with celiac, and 54% of children have increased liver enzymes at the time of diagnosis.

Interviewer: Mm-hmm.

Dr. Tom O'Bryan: It's because the liver's inflamed in almost half of them. So the test was endomysium and transglutaminase. So here's the kicker that so many practitioners aren't aware of yet, is that if you look at the studies on transglutaminase and endomysium, most of the studies say slam dunk, this is the test to do. 97% accuracy, 99% accuracy, 98%, really high percentage accuracies. 

And they're consistent saying this, so all the doctors believe that's the test to do. But when you read the actual articles, those researchers looked for people with celiac disease. And those people with celiac disease had those enzymes elevated. Okay. It's a good test if you have celiac disease.

Interviewer: Mm-hmm.

Dr. Tom O'Bryan: But what's the definition of celiac disease? The definition of celiac disease is when your microvilli, the shags, are worn down completely. I wrote many of these authors. And if you read the papers carefully, you see this. But I wrote the authors and said, doctors, did you include in your study group people whose shags were only partially worn down, or people whose shags were just inflamed and hadn't yet worn down. So an earlier stage . . . 

Interviewer: Mm-hmm.

Dr. Tom O'Bryan: . . . of this problem.  And every one of them said, no, celiac disease is total villous atrophy. So all of those studies that show the blood tests are very accurate are based on people that are at the end stage where their microvilli are totally worn down. And the studies that looked deeper show that, if you have partial villous atrophy, or if you just have the inflammation, the accuracy of the test is as low as 25%. Meaning that it gives false negatives, saying there's no problem . . .

Interviewer: Mm-hmm.

Dr. Tom O'Bryan: . . . up to seven out of ten times. So the doctor gets  a test back that he believes in because the laboratory showing the studies says how valid the test is, and the test says you don't have a problem. And he tells the patient. But doc, I feel so much better if I don't eat gluten. No, I see your immune system is just fine. It's okay. It must be stress, or it must be something else. 

Interviewer: Mm-hmm.

Dr. Tom O'Bryan: It was the test. It's a very good test if your shags are completely worn down. A new laboratory opened up three years ago called Cyrex Laboratories. C-Y-R-E-X. Cyrexlabs.com. They look for the sensitivity to gluten. They also look at the transglutaminase antibodies, but they look to see are you making antibodies to one of the clumps of the brick wall, a peptide of gluten. 

Interviewer: Mm-hmm.

Dr. Tom O'Bryan: Now until then, every laboratory only looked at one peptide of gluten, a 33-brick clump. It's called alpha gliadin. And that test would be positive in up to 50% of celiacs. That would show that, yup, here's the sensitivity to gluten, but in the other 50%, it didn't. Well, that doesn't mean it's okay to eat gluten. But doctors didn't ask the question. 

Because we know celiac disease is a sensitivity to gluten. That's a slam dunk. Everyone knows that. That's accepted. But the blood test shows there's no problem with gluten. So all the researchers have said, well, you can't use the test for sensitivity to gluten as a valid test, because in 50% of the people, it's wrong. It says there's no problem, but we know there's a problem because the shags wear down. 

Interviewer: Mm-hmm.

Dr. Tom O'Bryan: They're only looking at one peptide. There are many different peptides when you break that brick wall with a sledge hammer. There are many different peptides. Cyrex Labs came up with a test that looks at 10 different peptides of gluten. So you don't get the false negatives any more. You can find out if there is a sensitivity to one of the clumps of brick, one of the peptides of gluten. 

Interviewer: Mm-hmm.

Dr. Tom O'Bryan: That testing now gives the doctors the ammunition, the validation, to say, we really should do a trial here to see if your body does better off of gluten.

Interviewer: Mm-hmm.

Dr. Tom O'Bryan: And that doesn't mean that you dabble in this, Mrs. Patient. Now here's the rule. You can't be a little pregnant. You can't have a little gluten, because your immune system is not tolerant. It will get activated if you have any. 

Interviewer: Mm-hmm.

Information

Dr. Tom O'Bryan clears up confusion about gluten sensitivity and Celiac Disease. Find out why previous tests were sometimes up to 70 percent wrong! Also find out what you need to know when it comes to finding out what your issue might be as it relates to gluten.

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